20 Minute Task- Write About the Royal Charter and the Free Press

The freedom of the press is at risk due to the government’s proposed Royal Charter on press regulation.

Independent self-regulation is to be brought in after it being recommended by the Leveson Inquiry.

The last time the British imposed a law that regulated press freedom was in the 1690’s.

Executive director of the Society of Editors, Bob Satchwell, said that the Charter meant “you wouldn’t have a free press any longer.”

“People in other countries, not just journalists, are looking at what’s going on here at the moment in horror.”

Harriet Harman, the Shadow Culture Secretary said newspapers had nothing to fear from the all-party draft Charter.

(107 words)

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The freedom of the press is at risk due to the government’s proposed Royal Charter on press regulation.

Independent self-regulation is to be brought in after it being recommended by the Leveson Inquiry.

The last time the British imposed a law that regulated press freedom was in the 1690’s.

The draft proposals are set to be formally agreed by the Privy Council on October 30th in an effort to have a stronger, more independent press regulator following the phone-hacking scandal in 2012.

Executive director of the Society of Editors, Bob Satchwell, said that the charter meant “you wouldn’t have a free press any longer.”

“People in other countries, not just journalists, are looking at what’s going on here at the moment in horror.”

Campaigners said that the proposal changes meant there is “no reason” for the press to refuse to back the Charter.

Harriet Harman, the Shadow Culture Secretary said newspapers had nothing to fear from the all-party draft Charter.

Professor Luckhurst from the University of Kent, who was a former editor of The Scotsman and BBC journalist said: “I very much hope no newspaper agrees to sign up … it clearly leaves politicians looming over the press. It is preposterous that MPs think newspapers will agree to regulation subject to the whim of ­politicians.”

(213 words)

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The freedom of the press is at risk due to the government’s proposed Royal Charter on press regulation.

The Charter was presented to Parliament on Friday. It comes a week after the Privy Council rejected the newspapers’ proposal for a new, tougher regulatory ­structure.

Executive director of the Society of Editors, Bob Satchwell, said that the Charter meant “you wouldn’t have a free press any longer.”

“People in other countries, not just journalists, are looking at what’s going on here at the moment in horror,” he added.

Independent self-regulation is to be brought in after it was recommended by the Leveson Inquiry.

The Leveson Inquiry was set up following fury from both politicians and the general public in reaction to the phone-hacking scandal. This was first revealed when it was reported that the News of the World had accessed the private voicemail messages of Milly Dowler, the teenager who was murdered in 2002.

The draft proposals are set to be formally agreed by the Privy Council on October 30th in an effort to have a stronger, more independent press regulator following the phone-hacking scandal in 2012. The last time the British imposed a law that regulated press freedom was in the 1690’s.

The Conservatives, Liberal Democrats and Labour parties believe the regulation meets the criteria given by Lord Justice Leveson following his inquiry into press conduct.

“The idea that politicians can have any say in any way in the running of a free press is simply laughable,” said former News of the World executive editor Neil Wallis to the BBC.

Campaigners for Hacked Off, the group for victims of press intrusion, said that the proposal changes meant there is “no reason” for the press to refuse to back the new regulations.

Maria Miller, the Culture Secretary, said the Charter would safeguard the future of local papers and press freedom. While Miller stated that the draft charter included some “really important” changes, she commented that there would be no movement on how the current system would be revised.

The all-party Charter states that changes could only be made with a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

The Shadow Culture Secretary, Harriet Harman, insisted that newspapers had nothing to fear from the all-party draft charter.

Professor Luckhurst from the University of Kent, who was a former editor of The Scotsman and BBC journalist said: “I very much hope no newspaper agrees to sign up … it clearly leaves politicians looming over the press. It is preposterous that MPs think newspapers will agree to regulation subject to the whim of ­politicians.”

“We need more free speech, not less, we need more whistleblowing and we need a free popular press that, because of its mass market appeal, is powerful enough to make an impact on public opinion. The popular press does a hugely important job,” added Luckhurst.

(474 words)

References:

All information, quotes, and facts taken from the following websites…
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24504616
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/debateni/blogs/press-freedom-let-good-and-bad-times-roll-29663320.html
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/436322/Why-politicians-and-celebrities-want-to-control-newspapers
http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/press-regulation-deal-struck-on-new-royal-charter-1-3138970
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24498662

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